We at CFIF often highlight the clear and present danger that drug price control schemes pose to American…
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New Lung Cancer Breakthrough Illustrates the Potential Peril of Drug Price Controls

We at CFIF often highlight the clear and present danger that drug price control schemes pose to American consumers, who benefit from our private pharmaceutical sector that leads the world - by far - in innovation.  A new lung cancer treatment breakthrough in the form of Amgen's Lumakras illustrates that interrelationship.

Simply put, Lumakras reduced the risk of progression by 34% compared to chemotherapy in patents with advanced lung cancer, which is particularly welcome considering lung cancer's especially low survival rate (18.6% over five years, and just 5% for advanced forms).  The breakthrough required years of research and enormous amounts of investment, however, which The Wall Street Journal notes makes Lumakras the type of innovation put at risk by new drug price controls…[more]

September 22, 2022 • 05:06 PM

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Power to the People – Even if It Comes From Coal Print
By Betsy McCaughey
Wednesday, July 06 2022
The importance of the West Virginia ruling goes way beyond energy. It limits rulemaking by executive agencies or departments on any matters without express authority from Congress.

Despite its name, the Democratic Party has no time for democracy. Public opinion and democracy be damned, especially when it comes to battling climate change.

On June 30, the Supreme Court struck down an Environmental Protection Agency plan compelling states to shutter coal-fired power plants and shift to low-carbon alternatives such as natural gas and wind. The justices ruled 6-3 in West Virginia v. Environmental Protection Agency that it's up to Congress, the people's elected representatives, to answer "major questions," like whether the federal government should shut down coal-fired plants and demand states adopt other ways of generating electricity. 

The EPA's plan, devised during the Obama administration, was an end run around Congress.

Democrats and their media toadies are bashing the Court's ruling, labelling it "catastrophic." No charge is too extreme. Congressman Jamaal Bowman says the court is "killing America." 

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer rails the ruling will lead to needless deaths from pollution. Sorry, senator, but the Court did not rule in favor of pollution. It ruled for democracy, calling on you and other members of Congress to roll up your sleeves and do your jobs.

Chief Justice John Roberts explained, "capping carbon dioxide emissions at a level that will force a nationwide transition away from the use of coal to generate electricity may be a sensible solution," but only Congress can make a "decision of such magnitude." Roberts pointed out that Congress had considered such a drastic move and rejected it.

The New York Times laments that the Biden administration will be forced to "double down" on persuading Congress to eliminate coal-powered electricity generation. Democracy is so inconvenient. 

Ten states are heavily dependent on coal-fired plants, including West Virginia, Wyoming, Missouri, Kentucky and Utah – those pesky flyover states.

Washington Post columnist Eugene Robinson is melting down into hysteria, claiming the U.S. can't wait for Congress to act. Robinson wants the unelected, unaccountable federal bureaucracy to shut the plants down. So much for the consent of the governed.

Fact is, states are already decarbonizing their electric grids and moving to wind and solar at an alarming pace. It's alarming because renewables are not yet adequate to meet demand during summer heat waves, according to a report from the Federal Regulatory Energy Commission. Some parts of the country could be hit with blackouts and energy price hikes as high as 233% this summer. Those price hikes will make the prices at the pump look reasonable.

That's why energy policy decisions should be made by the people's elected representatives, who have to balance climate and cost and face voters on Election Day. Bureaucrats could care less. 

Roberts expressed skepticism that the EPA would recognize when energy prices have become "exorbitant."

The importance of the West Virginia ruling goes way beyond energy. It limits rulemaking by executive agencies or departments on any matters without express authority from Congress. "The Supreme Court gave power back to the people," said Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Roberts reiterated that the Court recently struck down the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's eviction moratorium and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's vaccine mandates for workplaces. The high Court is a referee, red-flagging federal agencies' attempts to exercise rulemaking powers way beyond what Congress gave them. 

The public should be cheering. Otherwise, what unpopular rule could be next? The FDA banning high-calorie foods to combat obesity? The Department of Transportation banning gas-powered cars? 

Or the Department of Agriculture holding school lunch subsidies hostage to school districts prohibiting transgender athletes in girls' sports? Sorry, that is already happening.

The Washington Post accuses the Court of judicial activism, warning the West Virginia decision sets a "new precedent to overturn all sort of rules" the justices "dislike."

Nonsense. The justices didn't vote for coal plants. They voted to put policy decisions of national significance in the hands of Congress, where such decisions belong.

The Court says, "power to the people." Sadly, Democrats disagree.


Betsy McCaughey is a former lieutenant governor of New York and chairman of the Committee to Reduce Infection Deaths. 

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Quiz Question   
Which one of the following U.S. Presidents signed the executive order establishing the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)?
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Notable Quote   
 
"Now they tell us. We're referring to the Congressional Budget Office, which finally rolled in Monday with its cost estimate for President Biden's unilateral student-loan write-down: $420 billion. ...The cost of Mr. Biden's unilateral extension of the moratorium on student loan payments for another three months through December will be $20 billion. But that's a bargain compared to the $400 billion…[more]
 
 
—The Wall Street Journal Editorial Board
— The Wall Street Journal Editorial Board
 
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