Below are links to tributes from across the web to our friend Bruce Herschensohn, who served on CFIF…
CFIF on Twitter CFIF on YouTube
Tributes to Bruce Herschensohn (September 10, 1932 – November 30, 2020)

Below are links to tributes from across the web to our friend Bruce Herschensohn, who served on CFIF's Board of Directors from its inception until his death on November 30, 2020. May he R.I.P. The Happiest Warrior, by Troy Senik, in City Journal Remembering Bruce Herschensohn, by John Gizzi, in Newsmax Bruce Herschensohn, RIP, by Timothy Sandefur, in The Dispatch Remembering Bruce Herschensohn, by Hugh Hewitt, The Richard Nixon Foundation Bruce Herschensohn: A Friend of Freedom, by Larry Greenfield, in Jewish Journal Bruce Herschensohn, R.I.P., by Arnold Steinberg, in National Review School of Public Policy Mourns the Loss of Bruce Herschensohn, by Pepperdine School of Public Policy Bruce Herschensohn (September 10, 1932…[more]

December 04, 2020 • 11:17 AM

Liberty Update

CFIFs latest news, commentary and alerts delivered to your inbox.
Jester's CourtroomLegal tales stranger than stranger than fiction: Ridiculous and sometimes funny lawsuits plaguing our courts.
Remember The Riots? They're Still Happening Print
By Byron York
Wednesday, October 07 2020
Maybe if the violence were covered more in the media, Biden would be forced to actually confront it.

It wasn't too long ago that the news was filled with reports of violent protests in Portland, Oregon; Seattle; Washington, D.C., and other cities around the nation. And then ... silence. Networks and newspapers are going wall-to-wall with analyses of every syllable uttered by President Trump's doctors as he is treated for COVID-19. Of course, that's news, but in the meantime, other news  like a continuing plague of violence in those cities and elsewhere — has virtually disappeared from the coverage.

But it's still there. A look at the Portland police Twitter page from the last few nights shows yet another march and confrontation with police. (Nobody bothers to keep count of the number of consecutive nights there has been violence.) "The march has arrived at the new courthouse at 1200 SW 1st Ave.," police tweeted between 10 p.m. and 11 p.m. local time Sunday, Oct. 4. "Some participants have begun vandalizing the building. Do not do this. You are subject to arrest. To the van supporting the march: it is unsafe and illegal to drive the wrong way on a 1-way." As the marchers continued, police warned, "Vandalism to the courthouse will not be tolerated. If you commit vandalism you are subject to arrest or use of force."

Remember when Democratic leaders and their allies in the media blamed it all on Trump? With the president nursing his illness 2,800 miles away, and with Democrats and media talkers consumed by other stories, the protests have continued. In Portland, the most recent targeted a brand-new $324 million courthouse, just opening this week. Six people were arrested.

Even more serious was an attack on a police officer. One recent morning, a Portland officer was doing paperwork in his car when a rioter smashed the car window and filled the car with pepper spray. The officer managed to radio a description of his attacker, who was later arrested in a car that police had been following earlier. "Inside the vehicle, officers found window punch tools, pepper spray, throwing knives, a laser pointer, a slingshot, rocks, and more," police noted. It was a rioter's toolkit.

Police reported that the suspect was a 41-year-old Portland man named John B. Russell. He was charged with assaulting a public safety officer, aggravated harassment and criminal mischief in the first degree. Like almost every other suspect accused of violence and rioting in Portland, Russell was quickly released.

There has also been trouble in Seattle and Washington, D.C., in the last few days. You just probably haven't heard about it.

It seems needless to say that none of this has anything to do with Black lives or any protest against real or alleged police brutality. Much of the agitation is clearly the work of the violent extremist movement antifa. Remember that at the presidential debate, Democratic candidate Joe Biden declared, "Antifa is an idea, not an organization." President Trump responded, "Oh, you gotta be kidding ... When a bat hits you over the head, it's not an idea. ... Antifa is a dangerous radical group." Biden's response was to mock the president by saying, "You have no ideas."

But in Portland, if antifa is an idea, it's an idea armed with window punch tools, pepper spray, throwing knives, a laser pointer, a slingshot, rocks and more. Biden defended his statement by saying that FBI Director Christopher Wray had called antifa an "idea." "That is what [the] FBI director said," Biden claimed.

But Wray, in House testimony on Sept. 17, said: "We look at antifa as more of an ideology or a movement than an organization. To be clear, we do have quite a number of properly predicated domestic terrorism investigations into violent anarchists, extremists, any number of whom self-identify with the antifa movement." On multiple other occasions, Wray referred to the "antifa movement." He also noted that antifa is "coalescing" into an actual group in some areas.

So perhaps Biden should call antifa a violent movement. But put semantics aside. Maybe if the violence were covered more in the media, Biden would be forced to actually confront it. But for now, remember that violence and unrest are indeed still going on  even if they don't make the news.


Byron York is chief political correspondent for The Washington Examiner.
COPYRIGHT 2020 BYRON YORK

Question of the Week   
How long was the United States Information Agency (USIA) in operation?
More Questions
Quote of the Day   
 
"Many elected officials have told Americans for months to stay home and forego everything from religious gatherings and team sports to holiday dinners and even funerals to stem the spread of the coronavirus. And yet we keep seeing news reports about officials flouting their own rules with a nice dinner out or a trip.The rules just don't seem to apply to America's political class. Their refusal to…[more]
 
 
—Sally Pipes, Pacific Research Institute President, CEO, and Thomas W. Smith Fellow in Health Care Policy
— Sally Pipes, Pacific Research Institute President, CEO, and Thomas W. Smith Fellow in Health Care Policy
 
Liberty Poll   

Are the numerous controversies over Election 2020 increasing or decreasing your engagement in political activism?